Assembly Leadership cannot resist slipping in a fast one | Wis.Community

Assembly Leadership cannot resist slipping in a fast one

Politics News

WILL moves veto complaint to Supreme Court, and files complaint with WEC

State Supreme Court Seal

Today the State Supreme Court agreed to hear a brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, which claimed that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.

Jeff Smith - Recognizing Indigenous People’s Day

Senator Jeff Smith

There’s quite an interest in genealogy these days. We can now order a kit to learn what ethnicities make up our DNA to better understand our heritage and ancestry. Even beyond this initial discovery, we can connect to unknown relatives. It’s a privilege to learn more about who we are from our ancestry.

 

Live Stream of President Trump Rally in Minneapolis

Live: President Trump holds rally in Minneapolis, Minnesota

Normally we do not do this, but since the rally is so close to home - this live stream should come up when the rally in Minneapolis starts.

State Assembly turmoil over resolution 12 - update

Robin Vos

WisEye Morning Minute: Assembly Rule Changes

The state assembly has been involved in an acrimonious debate over the proposed rule changes in the Assembly. Rep Jimmy Anderson (D - District 37), whose request for the ability to call in to assembly meetings  has been stonewalled by GOP leadership for months, provided a heartbreaking testimony to his attempts to have the Asseembly conform to the ADA by allowing him to call in when he is incapable of attending meetings. This is already allowed by state senate rules.

Assembly Leadership cannot resist slipping in a fast one

The state assembly today will address a set of rule changes that is ostensibly aimed at addressing the request made by Rep. Jimmy Anderson to have his needs accommodated so that he can participate more effectively in the Assembly. Though this particular rule change seems a reasonable accommodation the GOP apparently could not resist sticking a set of poison pills into the bill to make life difficult for the Democrats. The requirements of Rep.

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Today, October 16

  • Steve Hanson
    4:48pm

    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.

  • Steve Hanson
    4:38pm

    Too many differences to list. See Revisions for details.

  • Steve Hanson
    4:27pm

    Changes to Body
    -
    Today the State Supreme Court agreed to hear a lawsuit [1] brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, claiming that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.
    +
    Today the State Supreme Court agreed to hear a lawsuit [1] brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, which claimed that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.
     
    The lawsuit references a number of vetoes, including the one that created a $75 million dollar grant program for local road projects. 
     
    The lawsuit references a number of vetoes, including the one that created a $75 million dollar grant program for local road projects. 
     
    WILL asked the Supreme Court to take the case directly and to bypass the lower courts. Rick Esenberg from WILL admits that previous governors have done similar things,  but that WILL has not had the capacity to challenge these vetoes until recently. The Governor Veto in Wisconsin is particularly powerful and allows the Governor to do partial vetoes by crossing out individual words, numbers, and sentences from appropriations bills. Eight lawsuits have been brought in the past on appropriations vetoes in Wisconsin, which have resulted in some minor reigning-in of the veto. In particular, the "Vanna White" veto (which allowed rearrangement of letters) was removed in a 2009 constitutional amendment. It is not clear that this new lawsuit brings anything to the party that has not been argued in court in the past. 
     
    WILL asked the Supreme Court to take the case directly and to bypass the lower courts. Rick Esenberg from WILL admits that previous governors have done similar things,  but that WILL has not had the capacity to challenge these vetoes until recently. The Governor Veto in Wisconsin is particularly powerful and allows the Governor to do partial vetoes by crossing out individual words, numbers, and sentences from appropriations bills....
    Read more
  • Steve Hanson
    4:23pm

    Changes to Body
    -
    Today the State Supreme Court agreed to heal a lawsuit [1] brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, claiming that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.
    +
    Today the State Supreme Court agreed to hear a lawsuit [1] brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, claiming that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.
     
    The lawsuit references a number of vetoes, including the one that created a $75 million dollar grant program for local road projects. 
     
    The lawsuit references a number of vetoes, including the one that created a $75 million dollar grant program for local road projects. 
     
    WILL asked the Supreme Court to take the case directly and to bypass the lower courts. Rick Esenberg from WILL admits that previous governors have done similar things,  but that WILL has not had the capacity to challenge these vetoes until recently. The Governor Veto in Wisconsin is particularly powerful and allows the Governor to do partial vetoes by crossing out individual words, numbers, and sentences from appropriations bills. Eight lawsuits have been brought in the past on appropriations vetoes in Wisconsin, which have resulted in some minor reigning-in of the veto. In particular, the "Vanna White" veto (which allowed rearrangement of letters) was removed in a 2009 constitutional amendment. It is not clear that this new lawsuit brings anything to the party that has not been argued in court in the past. 
     
    WILL asked the Supreme Court to take the case directly and to bypass the lower courts. Rick Esenberg from WILL admits that previous governors have done similar things,  but that WILL has not had the capacity to challenge these vetoes until recently. The Governor Veto in Wisconsin is particularly powerful and allows the Governor to do partial vetoes by crossing out individual words, numbers, and sentences from appropriations bills. Eight...
    Read more
  • Steve Hanson
    4:22pm

    Today the State Supreme Court agreed to hear a brought by the Wisconsin Institute for Law and Liberty, which claimed that the vetoes that Governor Evers used in the last budget are new laws, rather than vetoes of laws that were passed in the legislature.

    The lawsuit references a number of vetoes, including the one that created a $75 million dollar grant program for local road projects. 

    WILL asked the Supreme Court to take the case directly and to bypass the lower courts. Rick Esenberg from WILL admits that previous governors have done similar things,  but that WILL has not had the capacity to challenge these vetoes until recently. The Governor Veto in Wisconsin is particularly powerful and allows the Governor to do partial vetoes by crossing out individual words, numbers, and sentences from appropriations bills. Eight lawsuits have been brought in the past on appropriations vetoes in Wisconsin, which have resulted in some minor reigning-in of the veto. In particular, the "Vanna White" veto (which allowed rearrangement of letters) was removed in a 2009 constitutional amendment. It is not clear that this new lawsuit brings anything to the party that has not been argued in court in the past. Reading the suit does, however, provide and interesting history of the budget veto in Wisconsin.

    Will has also filed a complaint with the Wisconsin Elections Commission about the way that the commission si dealing with voters who may have moved and are flagged in the ERIC (Electronic Registration Information Center) database. Although the legislature has required that the state use the ERIC database, it is not clear that the law requires any particular action re: voters who may have moved. Following the rules that WILL would like to see put in place, the state c to vote in the upcoming presidential primary. The state currently waits for two years before removing voters who have moved, while WILL claims that voters must be purged within 30 days. The Elections Commission t on the complaint.

    Read more

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