Media

Discussion and information about media in Wisconsin, concentrating on various forms of community media, PEG TV, low power radio, and hyperlocal web sites and blogs.

When the Hills are Gone - A Review

Thomas Pearson

I recently read When the Hills Are Gone - a book about the sand mining activists in Wisconsin during the period of the frac sand boom. The author, Thomas W. Pearson, is an associate professor of anthropology at UW-Stout. A disclaimer - I've known Tom for years, particularly since the frac sand activist period documented in this book. 

The Death of Democracy by a thousand paper cuts

News is essential to democracy. More and more, the news that we rely on to make daily decisions is disappearing. Oh, there's plenty of news out there, but as our president is so fond of saying, much of it is fake news. News with an agenda, news with a slant, news that is nothing but a pack of lies. News in a silo does nothing for democracy, it only serves to polarize and make it nigh impossible for people in opposing camps to even speak, much less understand each other.

Closed Captioning Rule endangers availability of governmental meeting videos

meeting

Confusion is reigning among community television groups in the state as it is becoming unclear if video of governmental meetings can be shown on community tv.

Lisa Lucas - Make Your Voice Matter: Working with the Media

Lisa Lucas

Lisa Lucas - Make Your Voice Matter

The Do's and Dont's of building relationships with the media, pitching stories, and getting your message amplified. This is a talk given at the Western Wisconsin Citizen Summit on Nov. 12, 2017 in Eau Claire.

Lisa Lucas is the Communications Director at Wisconsin Voices. She has a background in nonprofit and communications management. A Wisconsin native, Lisa holds a BA in Political Science and Public Relations from the University of Wisconsin.

ADA vs PEG TV in Brown County

Brown County Logo

Rules have existed for several years now regarding closed captioning of television, largely enforced through the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA. The implementation fo closed captioning varies wildly, from the careful captioning you will see on network television shows, to amusingly terrible, as you will see on live television in many cases. I occasionally turn on the closed captioning on our local TV News just for the entertainment value of seeing how inaccurate it is. But the ADA rules are causing big problems for one TV provider in Wisconsin.

My cord-cutting story part 2

So, a while back I wrote a little about our attempt to cut the cord on our TV. The ever-increasing price of cable (even on our wonderful telephone co-op service) had been becoming hard to bear, not to mention the fact that the company providing the cable service to the co-op seems to be a tad on the sloppy side.  We have often found our local PBS channel only has one channel of stereo sound, and some other anomalies.

Another Trip down Memory Lane with Jack Benny

Jack Benny in To Be or Not To Be

This is partly a test to see if I have fixed the caching problems for the audio player, and partly just because I love old Jack Benny shows. In this one, we go back to the "I Can't Stand Jack Benny" contest.  In 1945 as the war was drawing to a close, the show ran a contest with big prizes where you entered by sending in a card explaining why you can't stand Jack Benny.  This was seriously in tune with the self-deprecating humor of the show, and the continual jibes aimed at Jack. Enjoy this show.

GOING BACK TO BASICS: SIX TAKEAWAYS FROM KNIGHT’S MEDIA LEARNING SEMINAR

Trust, Journalism, Fake News, Technology and the Future of Informed Communities

In an era of virtual reality, artificial intelligence and ever-evolving media platforms, the biggest lesson for the future of journalism is that it’s time to get back to basics.

Progressive Talk Radio returns to Wisconsin

Progressive Talk Radio returned to Wisconsin yesterday.