Resources | Wis.Community

Resources

Different environmental resources -- organizations, web sites, and more.

Resource Type: Organization

MissionOur mission is to organize collectively to fight climate change NOW - through education, advocacy, and bold proposals that sharply reduce fossil fuel extraction and emissions by fostering a clean energy economy and creating sustainable communities.Global warming is changing our planet, and we must act locally to join regional, national, and international movements to respond boldly to climate change. Climate change is not just a future threat, but a reality.
Mission Statement:"To oppose the construction of a golf course within the Black River Forest and to promote the preservation of the integrity of that river, its wetlands, the forest and the adjoining Lake Michigan shore as an ecological whole."  
Our mission is to create, support and protect a thousand-mile footpath tracing Ice Age formations across Wisconsin – the Ice Age National Scenic Trail.
2110 Main Street Cross Plains, WI 53528
Rain to Rivers...Wise Choices for Cleaner Waters is an education campaign sponsored by Rain to Rivers of Western Wisconsin, a partnership between several local and county governments who are all required to have state permits to regulate storm water. Rain to Rivers also receives support and assistance from UW-Extension, and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources. Rain to Rivers facilitates the coordination of information and education programs among the different members.
In the early 1990s a university professor, his graduate student, and some dedicated river folk – a motley mix of trout anglers, paddlers, and conservationists and educators -- hatched an idea that would grow into one of the largest and strongest statewide river conservation organizations in the nation and is recognized as one of Wisconsin's leading conservation groups.
147 S. Butler Street, Suite 2 Madison, Wisconsin 53703

Resource Type: Information

Wisconsin website of photos of Frac Sand Mines.
Frac Sand Mines and Plants are destroying hills, forests, farms and prairie. These companies say that they will reclaim the land (the word “restore” has been used by promoters) when they are through shipping all this sand out of state. Either word is an obfuscation. The forests and hills along with their previous animal denizens will be gone forever. At best we will be left with shallow lakes and some non-native grass. A further question is who will maintain these holding ponds when the sites are “reclaimed”?

Resource Type: Nonprofit, Organization

Midwest Environmental Advocates is a nonprofit environmental law center that works for healthy water, air, land and government for this generation and the next. We believe that every citizen has the potential to make a difference.
612 W Main Street, Suite 302 Madison, WI 53703
The Chippewa Savannas Chapter is partially within the Driftless Area of western Wisconsin. The area contains dry hill prairies commonly found in the Drfitless Area, but we also have savannas throught the chapter's area.  In additon, river terrace prairies and savannas are found along our large rivers. We share our knowledge within our membership, and with others through outreach activities. The Chippewa Savannas Chapter covers Pepin, Dunn and Eau Claire Counties in Wisconsin. We invite you to join us! 

Resource Type: Information, Nonprofit, Organization

A non-profit dedicated to fighting sand mine development in Wisconsin.
The John Muir chapter is the Wisconsin chapter of the national Sierra Club
Mission Statement It is the mission of the Sustain Rural Wisconsin Network (SRWN) is to assemble a statewide coalition of individuals and organizations dedicated to preserving the environment while maintaining the health and economic vitality of rural communities.

Resource Type: Information, Political

Long-time blog about the environment in Wisconsin and the interplay with Politics.  Written by James Rowen.

Resource Type: Nonprofit

Our Roots With its roots in farmland protection since 1988, by the time Wisconsin Farmland Conservancy had changed its name to West Wisconsin Land Trust in 2002, over 4,500 acres of farms, forests and open space had been protected. The statewide emphasis of saving the family farm gave way to a mission of protecting open space in an approximately 10-county area of western Wisconsin. As the momentum for private land protection grew, so grew the area in which WWLT worked stretching from the Black River in the south to the shores of Lake Superior, covering 20 counties.
Suite 307 500 East Main St. Menomonie, WI 54751

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