WI Leg Council Releases Memo on Walker Rule That Opens Door For Deep Teacher Pay Cuts | Wis.Community

WI Leg Council Releases Memo on Walker Rule That Opens Door For Deep Teacher Pay Cuts

The nonpartisan Wisconsin State Legislature Legislative Council has released an on the new Walker rule that gives school boards and other municipalities the "tool" of not including educational and other wage add-ons workers have earned over the years in the calculation of base wages in union contracts.  For teachers, this is, on average, 30% of a teacher's salary. While school boards and other municipalities can restore that funding was taken out of the contract, it now "granted at the discretion of the municipal employer.":

As described above, MERA creates the process for collective bargaining on base wages and defines “base wages” as excluding certain types of compensation. This means that any compensation that is not “base wages” is not a subject of collective bargaining and is granted at the discretion of the municipal employer.

Although not defined in MERA itself, “supplemental compensation” generally means pay that is given to an individual in consideration for completion of approved educational courses and that is given as a supplement to the basic pay set for the person’s position. [See, e.g., s. 40.05(4) (b) and (bm), Stats.]

EmR1203 creates the calculation to implement collective bargaining on base wages under MERA in order to determine the maximum amount of base wages that are subject to collective bargaining. “Base wages,” for purposes of EmR1203, excludes supplemental compensation, such as education credits or credentials in pay schedules, overtime, premium pay, lump sum merit pay, performance pay, and extra duty pay.

Given the exclusion of supplemental compensation from base wages, as required by MERA, the base wage rate subject to collective bargaining for a particular general municipal employee position may be different than a person’s actual wage rate. Supplemental compensation, or any wages that are not “base wages,” are not subject to collective bargaining and are granted at the discretion of the municipal employer.

As discussed before, while it is true that school boards and other employers can put back the huge sum of money that was removed for "educational add-ons" and other "add-ons," many school boards will simply not have the money to restore the funding and many short-sighted districts will use the tool to balance their budgets on the backs of teachers. 

Published

May 4, 2012 - 9:31am

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