If Ron Johnson's against the war, he'll never tell | Wis.Community

If Ron Johnson's against the war, he'll never tell

Ron Johnson, in the Journal Sentinel:

Johnson’s most pointed comments were directed at Feingold, saying that when he and other senators “come out and start demanding a U.S. pullout and that kind of thing in public, it just undermines what our troops are trying to do.”

Said Johnson: “That’s not saying if you have real grave concerns as a member of Congress you should not be talking to the administration. It’s just extremely harmful to our nation when it’s all done in public.”

Asked whether he was saying it’s improper for Feingold or other senators to be speaking out publicly against the war, Johnson said: “I guess what I really object to is how quick and early he has been throughout his career (to criticize military action) . . . he has been carping about this from the sidelines forever.”

Johnson then repeated his suggestion that when there are troops in the field, lawmakers opposed to U.S. policy should be expressing their opposition in private rather than in public.

“There’s an appropriate way of opposing a policy and an inappropriate way,” he said. “The appropriate way if I’m a U.S. senator is going to be not public. If I’m opposed to something, I’ll make those views known very, very well, but privately with the administration.”

Russ Feingold responds, via Firedoglake:

“He would oppose wars only in private,” Feingold said, incredulously. “I’ve never heard anyone who understands their Constitution that the legislative branch should only oppose a war in private.” Feingold explained that Johnson would have to remain silent in town meetings on his true beliefs. He would have to decline to attend briefings and hearings lest his opinions be known. “He has an unconstitutional view of his job. It should be a major thing for the people of Wisconsin to send someone to Washington who doesn’t understand the most fundamental aspects of how to do the job.”

Published

August 24, 2010 - 4:30pm

Author

randomness